Baked Lemon Icebox Pie – bake and chill

 pieslice_3584s-copy

After spending a day trying to escape Sydney’s heatwave, pull open your freezer drawer to this sweet and delicious ice cold pie.

Make the pie the day before you want to serve it, as it needs to cool down for an hour after baking, then it needs to freeze for at least 4 hours in your icebox or freezer. 

Recipe for Baked Lemon Icebox Pie:

You’ll need a 25 cm (9 1/2”) pie dish

18 Digestive Wholemeal biscuits (Australia), or Graham Crackers (USA)
1/4 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons (60g) of unsalted butter, melted
2 x 395g (14 oz) cans of sweetened condensed milk
1 level dessertspoon of finely grated lemon zest from two lemons
3/4 cup (3 lemons) freshly squeezed lemon juice
8 large eggs, yolks only

Preheat your oven to 160°C (325°F).Rinse lemons and grate off the yellow zest.

In a food processor, pulse the biscuits/crackers until coarsely ground, but not a fine powder. Crumble any large pieces between your fingers.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan and use a fork to mix it through the biscuit crumb mixture. Add batches to a food processor and pulse for 30 seconds or less, just to mix the butter through.

Use a pastry brush to lightly coat the pie dish with butter, then tap-and-press the biscuit mix firmly into the base of the pie dish. I use a pestle or the handle of a knife to gently tap it flat. Then use your fingers to firmly press the crumb mixture up the sides of the pie dish, making them at least 3 cm (1 1/4”) high.

In a medium size bowl whisk together the condensed milk and lemon juice. Separate the eggs and place the egg yolks into a large bowl.

You won’t need the egg whites for this dish, so reserve them to use for another recipe, like meringues. Add the lemon zest to the egg yolks, and beat together until egg yolks look pale and frothy.

Use a spatula to combine the condensed milk mixture with the egg mixture, then mix thoroughly using an electric handheld mixer.

Pour the mixture into the cracker-biscuit shell. Bake for 25 minutes or until the middle of the pie filling is springy. Let the pie stand for an hour, then loosely cover with plastic cling wrap and place in the freezer for a minimum of 3 hours.

When cool, place the cooled pie into a cake tin or plastic box, and wrap the top with foil, piercing several air holes into the foil to stop moisture condensation dripping onto the pie.

Remove from freezer an hour before serving so pie is cold but not frozen.

Serve with cream, ice-cream, or frozen yoghurt.

Recipe from my cookbook SOULICIOUS

 

Chicken and Groundnut Stew

blogstew-copy

It’s already the first week of 2017, and as I didn’t get to eat any black eyed peas or collard greens at New Year I’ll have to make my own luck.

This week – recipe-wise – I’m taking a swing by Jamaica, via West Africa.

For this recipe post I’m ‘cooking the book’ and adapting a recipe from the cookbook ‘Jamaican cooking: 140 roadside and homestyle recipes’ (1997) by Lucinda Scala Quinn.

If you have a peanut allergy of any type then sadly this recipe isn’t for you.

Groundnut stew is common in much of West Africa. It originates from the Mandinka and Bambara people of Mali. In Wolof it’s called Maafe.

Recipes for the stew vary, but can include chicken, tomato, onion, garlic, cabbage, and leaf or root vegetables. Other versions include okra, corn, carrots, cinnamon, hot peppers, paprika, black pepper, turmeric, cumin, and other spices. Maafe is traditionally served with white rice, fonio or millet porridge in Mali, couscous, or fufu and sweet potatoes.

The African continent is the home of many ingredients now widely available in the African diaspora — from peanuts to yam, corn and pumpkin.

The use of peanuts in Jamaican cooking comes from a West African tradition. Most Jamaicans are familiar with the word pinda from a line in a children’s game, “Pop-si kai-si go pinda (peanut) shell.” 

You can add diced sweet potato instead of green beans to this recipe while the stew is cooking, or serve the chicken with a side of mixed greens, salad, and/or rice.

Although this recipe uses supermarket products – peanut butter and ketchup – those flavours blend together beautifully into a rich, semi-sweet sauce.

If you like you can use a whole chicken and cut it into 8 pieces yourself, but I’ve chosen to to adapt the original recipe and make the meal prep faster so I used pre-cut chicken thigh fillets and I’ve simplified the cooking style.

Chicken and Groundnut (Peanut) Stew

Makes 4 servings

6 chicken thigh fillets, skinless, each cut in half
1 small white onion, peeled, and diced
1-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped finely
2 1/2 cups water
2 T peanut oil
3/4 cup tomato sauce (ketchup)
2/3 cup crunchy peanut butter 
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or preferably, 1/2 a Scotch bonnet chilli seeded and minced – I couldn’t locate any scotch bonnet chillies, which add a sweet smokey heat, so I instead I used half a red habanero chilli. Be careful using fresh hot chillis and don’t touch your eyes!
A good handful of green beans, cut into pieces 

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the thigh fillet pieces (keep them loosely rolled up) and cook until lightly browned on each side.

Add the chopped onion, and ginger, and stirring, for about 3 minutes. Add tomato sauce and cook 3 mins more. Blend in the peanut butter, and stir in the water, salt and chilli pieces (or cayenne pepper).

Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer, and cook uncovered until the chicken for 15-20 mins, or until the chicken pieces are tender and cooked through.

If using green beans, add them half way through the cooking time.

blog-beans

Serve your Groundnut stew with a side of steamed rice, vegetables, or salad.

This stew can be cooked in advance and gently reheated with a little water.

Recipe adapted from ‘Jamaican cooking: 140 roadside and homestyle recipes’ (1997) by Lucinda Scala Quinn.

Follow me on facebook @awiaskitchen   instagram @awiaskitchen    twitter @awiaskitchen

It’s Tom and Jerry (egg-nog) season

dsc_0749x-copy

Are you a fan of egg-nog?

The first time I tried egg-nog it was homemade and handed to me by a German relative-by-friendship. It was strong enough and sweet enough to blow my head off, which it did.

As years went by I forgot about egg-nog until supermarkets started rolling out pre-made versions of it around Christmas time. I tried it one year and it was awful.

Egg-nog and I parted company again.

It wasn’t until I saw an old 1940s American black and white film set during an office Christmas party that egg-nog regained my attention and I remembered celebrating that Christmas Eve sipping a cup of the homemade German version.

In the film staff at the Christmas party were drinking Tom and Jerrys – another name for egg-nog. Feeling inspired and sentimental, I did some quick research online.

There are lots of recipes for egg-nog. Most American-style recipes add bourbon – a new idea to me. After experimenting, I realized what a good idea that is.

Some recipes throw all the ingredients into a blender and hit the button, but that takes away some of the cosy ceremony of being in the moment and creating it yourself.

Forget the pre-made stuff, and make your own. You’ll thank yourself for that tiny extra bit of effort as you sip your deliciously spicy and fluffy homemade version.

How to make a Tom and Jerry

Makes 2 mugs for two people – upsize quantities as needed

3 eggs
¼ cup caster sugar
Dark rum (spiced rum if you have it)
Ground allspice
Ground cinnamon (not cinnamon sugar)
Pinch of ground cloves
2 mugs of full cream milk
Bourbon or brandy (not cognac)
1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Separate the egg yolks and egg whites into two small bowls.

Beat the egg whites with an electric hand mixer until stiff.

Add the sugar to the bowl with the egg yolks and mix together until the sugar has dissolved. Then add ½-1 level teaspoon (to taste) of the allspice and cinnamon, then a small pinch of ground cloves.

Slowly stir 1 ½ nips of rum into the egg yolk mixture, taking care not to let it curdle.

Then fold in the beaten egg whites. If the egg whites have started to separate, remix with the hand mixer first.

In a small saucepan, gently heat the milk to very warm but not hot, and stir in the bourbon (or brandy). Then pour the egg mixture one third of the way up each mug.

Lastly pour the warm milk into each mug, stirring constantly.

To garnish, sprinkle with freshly grated nutmeg.

tom-jerry

*** Wishing you the best for the holiday season! ***

Pimp My Plate #32 – Will & Steve’s pop-up restaurant, Rozelle, NSW

blog-1a
Salmon Tartare with peas, apple & fennel remoulade

Can Will & Steve’s pop-up restaurant PIMP MY PLATE?

 

‘The gourmet pommies pop up at TRAMSHEDS’

Anyone who watched Australia’s TV cooking show My Kitchen Rules last year will remember the charming and affable Will & Steve, or as they call themselves, ‘the gourmet pommies’.

Hailing from Britain, Will Stewart and Steve Flood were the winners of the 2015 series of My Kitchen Rules, and first met when they moved to Australia with the same investment bank.

When circumstances changed in their financial careers, the pair decided to fully embrace their foodie side, the catalyst being when Steve applied for them both to appear on the show. It was a good move.

Since their TV win, Will and Steve have continued their career in food, lifestyle and media. And for the last 12 months the pair has been busy producing their first cookbook, appropriately named Will and Steve, Home Cook, Aspiring Chef.

Tonight’s event is one of four pop-up dinners hosted by them, to meet some of their fans who share their love of good food, and to promote their new cookbook by serving us a 3-course meal from it.

The venue is Sydney’s new dining hub TRAMSHEDS at Harold Park. The atmosphere here is a bit like dining in a restaurant inside a restaurant. The freestanding kitchen space and tables are positioned in the busy Artisan Lane area.

It’s Saturday night and all around us, the whole of TRAMSHEDS is buzzing, while we sip champagne at our tables, in anticipation. Diners from other bars and restaurants walk by, glancing across at our tables twinkling with glassware and tea lights.

Will and Steve are happy to pose for selfies and answer all our questions, before, during, and after plating and serving. Both are energetic personalities – Will loves to engage and share a laugh, and Steve is passionate about food. And both are generous with their time throughout the night.

With a glass of champagne in hand we watch the boys’ hard work that usually happens behind-the-scenes in a kitchen. Their rhythmic precision is enjoyable to watch, and despite them having only one person to help them prep and plate, Will and Steve manage to make the work appear effortless.

Then our entrées arrive, a pretty pink and green plate of Salmon Tartare with peas and pea foam, and apple and fennel remoulade. It’s a light and refreshing start, served with slivers of crunchy black sesame seed lavoche on the side.

The main is a juicy and beautifully crispy piece of Pork Belly served with Colcannon, heirloom carrots, and apple cider juice. The only improvement on this dish would be a sharper knife to glide through that crackling and maintain the architecture of the pork. But sharp knives are a rarity in restaurants these days.

Dessert is a Chocolate, Beetroot and Milk Crunch with dramatic plating with a dark red sauce embellishment that is part strobe effect and part ‘how to get away with murder’.

As we finish each course, we flick to the corresponding recipe page in cookbook. It’s beautifully produced and also features fresh reinventions of classics, including The Perfect Steak with truffle butter and parsnip chips; Lobster Rolls with mango salsa; White Pudding with apple chutney; Sarnies (British slang for sandwiches); and a Maple Pumpkin Tart with sweet dukkha and yoghurt – a must-cook alternative to serving pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving.

Will and Steve are now touring around Australia to promote cookbook and share their passion for fresh flavours that showcase Australian produce. Will and Steve’s website also features their recipes so take a look and be inspired.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

RATED: Pimped!  FOOD: 4.5/5   Fresh flavours
VALUE: 4/5   VENUE ATMOS: Industrial modern   VIBE:  Friendly and generous

http://www.willandsteve.com.au

Visit me on facebook at Awia’s Kitchen or twitter: @pimpmyplate   @awiaskitchen

 

Chilli-Choc Bliss Balls

1top.jpg

‘Baby it’s cold out there’

For my chilli-loving friends like me, I decided to revisit my original Bliss Balls Sugar Hack recipe and add some heat.

This is my first batch. It has a lingering warm chilli flavour. It’s subtle, not rocket-heat, as I wanted to experiment with a bottle of Chilli Choc Sauce I had in the cupboard.

You can add more or less sauce, and I plan on working through my cupboard of other hot sauces and spices and moving UP the heat scale with this recipe – health AND heat. Win-win!

(makes approx. 20)

30 pitted dates (from a 250 g pack)
1 tspn vanilla extract (not essence)
1 1/2 level Tbspn very finely ground espresso coffee
3 rounded Tbspn organic cacao powder
3/4 cup walnuts (buy whole or walnut pieces)
3/4 cup hazelnuts
1 Tbspn melted coconut oil
2 Tbspn Cranky Croc Choc Chilli Chocolate Sauce (made by The Chilli Factory)
3/4 cup dried dessicated coconut

Cut dates in half, and place in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Let sit for 10 mins, then drain and place the dates, vanilla, coffee, and cacao into the bowl of a food processor. Blend until the mixture starts to blend together.

2A_edited-1.jpg

Add the walnuts and hazelnuts to the mixture, and process again until the nuts are chopped into smaller pieces and the mixture starts to form a sticky ball.

Then drizzle in the melted coconut oil and pulse until incorporated.
Use a teaspoon to scoop out mixture and use your hands to roll the mixture into 1″ (2cm) round balls. Keep them small so they are just one or two bites.

Scatter coconut across a dinner plate, and roll the balls across to coat them.
Store in a sealed container, in the fridge or freezer.

new copy.jpg
The Chilli Factory’s Cranky Croc Chilli Chocolate Sauce